Serene Dominic issues Dark Lullaby in advance of new musical

dark lullaby

In advance of the spring 2018 Pan Production presentation of the new musical “Dark Lullaby,” Serene Dominic is releasing the album digitally in a 14-song version on September 26, 2018.  The compact disc version will also contains three additional songs slated for the upcoming musical that are not being premiered anywhere else until the Dark Lullaby Cast Album comes out this spring.

Serene’s first musical, “Swimming in the Head” (also a Pan Production)  was originally conceived as an album  called Unnatural Blonde and was then adapted into a musical format. “Dark Lullaby” was always conceived as a musical, so in a sense it almost is his first musical.

In fact, says Dominic, “Originally it was my intention to record a cast album first,  with different actors singing on everything, which would make for a uniquely weird album. But we’re doing it backwards now. I’ve assembled a pit band for the show that will be gigging around Arizona as the San Jacinto Death Row Prison Band right up to the production of the show. And we have a great cast who will actually put their vocals talents down on recordings before the show even goes into rehearsals.” The plan includes the seven-piece San Jacinto Death Row Prison band recording all the track and then playing them live during the production.

Some of the songs have been previewed on the onusrecords.bandcamp.com site and at Serene Dominic shows, including the old school soul ballad “You’re Gonna Know All About Me,” the bouncy “Cream Colored Cadillac” and the metallic basher “I Don’t Like You Mister.”

It’s a pretty odd mix of songs for a musical that’s patterned after an old 1940s film nior classic “Detour,” but takes place in the Eighties and has flashbacks in the Seventies.

“So musically it’s all over the map,” admits Dominic, who’s combined his love of everything from spaghetti western themes(the title song), British Invasion (“San Jacinto Death Row Prison Band”), old school country (“Married Couple’) baroque pop (“The Day Our Fancy Died”),  southern rock (“Down to the Ravine”) Motown (“All That Gorgeous Going to Waste”), Bollywood (” I Prefer”) and  headbanger metal (I Don’t Like You Mister), with rap sprinkled throughout. “We stop short of the Nineties,  not because of any crazy plan to keep it contemporary with the story- the songs genres represented here have very little to do with film noir. ” I was just trying to write songs I like, I wasn’t trying to create a Whitman sampler of chocolates. But I think that’s what it sounds like and why I like this album so much.”

When asked for a brief plot overview, Dominic said,  “The story follows a traveling musician’s accidental killing spree across the United States, which is a melting pot despite what our current president things. We’re made up of all kinds of people, I’ll have you know, so when you hear this suite of songs , it’ll feel like you’re traveling  with a rotating caste of players anyway. ”

The release of “Dark Lullaby” jumpstarts a season of brisk activity for Onus Records, the non-profit record label that Dominic co-runs. More upcoming releases this fall will includes new releases from The 1140s, The Breakup Society and Broken Poets, and the awaited third album from No Volcano which will appear in early 2018.

 

 

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Onus Records recalls “tempest in a t-shirt,” The Evolution VI

There was a time when calling someone a punk was not a compliment. And that time was February 7, 1966. Punk rock history was made on that day, for that was treal-revoltwhen Nicky Mollash walked into a Safeway supermarket on La Cienega Boulevard to purchase some Gleem toothpaste so he could look his best for a photo shoot at Pandora’s Box, a then popular hangout on the Sunset Strip. Mollash picked up a tube that was incorrectly priced at a whopping $5.99. When the gum chewing, non-plussed cashier, evidently a stranger to both retail and fluoride, demanded he pay the denoted price or put it back on the shelf, an irate Mollash completely lost it and started a small scale mini-mart riot, threatening the checkout girl, Procter and Gamble, its shareholders and of course, The Man for once again keeping him downer than he ought to be. The Evolution VI’s volatile lead singer was already smarting from being refused service at Bob Dalton’s Restaurant the night before, mostly because the feathers from his ostrich vest were landing on other patrons’ Porterhouse steaks.

Once the Channel 3 Action News Team reported this story, Mollash blew off the photo shoot, electing instead to dash off to his girlfriend’s house for a pity screw. Following that, he commemorated the day’s harrowing events by penning “Real Revolting”, which the group speedily recorded the next night while Mollash’s bile over the gunk caked on his pearly whites still churned inside of him. As blistering a rant of monetary outrage as this track was, Mollash (who has since mellowed about rock music and dental care) prefers the stereo version that appeared on the Here Comes The Evolution VI album because “Someone forgot to include bass and drum cymbals on the single version.” Still, some punk audio purists maintain the only true version of the song is the first take of the song found on initial German mono pressings of the Hier Kommt Die Evolution VI LP, which breaks into a fistfight during the harmonica solo and dissolves into plate throwing and name-calling thereafter.

The group’s collective moment in the spotlight proved to be profoundly brief, but some members continued to garner notoriety in a post-Evolution VI world. Drummer Bobby Munsey became an injury law specialist whose omnipresent Munsey, Rimbaldo & Associates billboards stare down on the seedy Strip where he and his bandmates marauded nearly half a century ago. When lead guitarist Denny Tollesen perished at sea in a tragic Segway Personal Transporter accident, Munsey wasted no time contacting Tolleson’s widow to tell her that she was entitled to a huge cash settlement that made them both obnoxiously rich.

But what of the angry young Nicky Mollash? In an ironic twist to an already moronic story, when Mollash left the world of rock music to write his 1975 self-help book Still Revolting: Channeling Your Inner Spoiled Brat, he admitted to the world that his rage was little more than “a tempest in a t-shirt.” It turned out that he was actually the son of Walter P. Mollash and stood to inherit the family fortune his Daddy amassed while he was president of Procter and Gamble’s chief rival, Lever Brothers. So much for punk rock.

To download  or stream “Real Revolting” as well as other great free music, visit onusrecords.bandcamp.com

Onus Records recalls “tempest in a t-shirt,” The Evolution VI

There was a time when calling someone a punk was not a compliment. And that time was February 7, 1966. Punk rock history was made on that day, for that was treal-revoltwhen Nicky Mollash walked into a Safeway supermarket on La Cienega Boulevard to purchase some Gleem toothpaste so he could look his best for a photo shoot at Pandora’s Box, a then popular hangout on the Sunset Strip. Mollash picked up a tube that was incorrectly priced at a whopping $5.99. When the gum chewing, non-plussed cashier, evidently a stranger to both retail and fluoride, demanded he pay the denoted price or put it back on the shelf, an irate Mollash completely lost it and started a small scale mini-mart riot, threatening the checkout girl, Procter and Gamble, its shareholders and of course, The Man for once again keeping him downer than he ought to be. The Evolution VI’s volatile lead singer was already smarting from being refused service at Bob Dalton’s Restaurant the night before, mostly because the feathers from his ostrich vest were landing on other patrons’ Porterhouse steaks.

Once the Channel 3 Action News Team reported this story, Mollash blew off the photo shoot, electing instead to dash off to his girlfriend’s house for a pity screw. Following that, he commemorated the day’s harrowing events by penning “Real Revolting”, which the group speedily recorded the next night while Mollash’s bile over the gunk caked on his pearly whites still churned inside of him. As blistering a rant of monetary outrage as this track was, Mollash (who has since mellowed about rock music and dental care) prefers the stereo version that appeared on the Here Comes The Evolution VI album because “Someone forgot to include bass and drum cymbals on the single version.” Still, some punk audio purists maintain the only true version of the song is the first take of the song found on initial German mono pressings of the Hier Kommt Die Evolution VI LP, which breaks into a fistfight during the harmonica solo and dissolves into plate throwing and name-calling thereafter.

The group’s collective moment in the spotlight proved to be profoundly brief, but some members continued to garner notoriety in a post-Evolution VI world. Drummer Bobby Munsey became an injury law specialist whose omnipresent Munsey, Rimbaldo & Associates billboards stare down on the seedy Strip where he and his bandmates marauded nearly half a century ago. When lead guitarist Denny Tollesen perished at sea in a tragic Segway Personal Transporter accident, Munsey wasted no time contacting Tolleson’s widow to tell her that she was entitled to a huge cash settlement that made them both obnoxiously rich.

But what of the angry young Nicky Mollash? In an ironic twist to an already moronic story, when Mollash left the world of rock music to write his 1975 self-help book Still Revolting: Channeling Your Inner Spoiled Brat, he admitted to the world that his rage was little more than “a tempest in a t-shirt.” It turned out that he was actually the son of Walter P. Mollash and stood to inherit the family fortune his Daddy amassed while he was president of Procter and Gamble’s chief rival, Lever Brothers. So much for punk rock.

To download  or stream “Real Revolting” as well as other great free music, visit onusrecords.bandcamp.com

From Woodstock with love, Thunderbear lays tracks

From time to time, Onus Records expands its horizons from its Sunnyslope confines to somewhere else where fine music is made. This week it has plunked us smack dab into bear country–Thunderbear Country, which geography and band bios tell us is located in Woodstock, NY.

Yes, that Woodstock. Their 5 song self-titled EP has Garth Hudson playing accordion on it. You don’t get much more Woodstock than that.

You can sample their unique blend of American roots music traditions, which they morph into their own acoustic/electric style in its entirety on their Bandcamp site. A standout track,  “Almost Forever,” is being featured as an which Onus Records “Single of the Weekend.” Go on, click on the cover, and it can be yours to stream and download.

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Group founder Bill “Thunderbear” Barrett was born in NYC. He grew up in Woodstock, NY, and received a BA in communications from Hunter College in Manhattan. He wrote, illustrated and published the novel Brown Water Café, his photographs of lightning were featured in calendars by BrownTrout Publishers, and his political cartoons have been featured in Earth Times and


He has been writing songs and playing gigs (including a time busking in London) since he was a teenager. In the late 1980s he became involved in the NYC music scene, playing with the legendary Joey Miserable and the Worms and in the acoustic band Les Ismore and his Excess Express which featured Jono Manson, John Popper and Joan Osborne.  Now back in Woodstock, he writes songs, sings and plays guitar in THUNDERBEAR.

Now meet the rest of the band:

David Andersen studied at Berklee College of Music.  He plays electric & acoustic bass and has performed with numerous local and regional acts.  He is also an accomplished recording engineer, producer, and arranger, and in addition to playing bass, he also engineered the sessions for the THUNDERBEAR CD.

Originally from Northern California, pedal steel/guitarist Rob Stein has played with a wide variety of artists, from Broadway show orchestras to the Bob Dylan Band. He relocated to Ireland in 1999, where he became deeply involved in Irish traditional music, working with some of the best and most exciting musicians in Ireland. He was introduced to the Woodstock area playing guitar for the legendary John Herald back in the 1990s—and he’s now back in the USA, back in Woodstock, bringing his unique range of musical experiences to THUNDERBEAR.

As a composer Eric Parker has written the top forty hit “Crazy Keep on Fallin” and his song “I’m the One” was featured on the Billboard Hot 100 chart. His song “Ramona,” as recorded by Grammy nominated jazz artist Cornell Dupree, was the theme for the 1997 Newport Jazz Festival. Eric has toured and recorded with Steve Winwood, Joe Cocker, Lou Reed, Bonnie Raitt, Carly Simon, James Taylor, Ian Hunter, Mick Taylor, Kingfish, Todd Rundgren, and Public Enemy, to name a few.  He has also worked directly with Philip Glass on a number of projects.  He brings his considerable talents as a drummer and composer to THUNDERBEAR.

The Extended Play gives us a peek into his satanic private world

ep brite.jpgUsually such eccentricities are reserved for the very rich and clinically insane, but If you’ll push him  or pretend to be interested long enough, The Extended Play a/k/a Franklin Hanyak will let you in on a little secret.

Not only is Their Satanic Majesties’ Request Hanyak’s favorite Rolling Stone album, it just may be his favorite album EVER!

“It’s got a very autumnal feel to it, so that’s probably why it resonates with me,” says Hanyak, who admits the 10 song album which critics lambasted as a “cosmic joke” and “lukewarm Sgt. Pepper without the smarts” is not for everyone.

“I had a real good friend, shove me after I insisted he give it a chance.  For me ‘Gomper’ could go on another three minutes before I’d fade it out.”

And if you really win Hanyak’s confidence, he’ll show you his Satanic Majesties memorabilia. None of this stuff comes cheap, and remember, he’s a drummer who will eat ramen every day of his life to purchase anything a trifle Satanic that arises. The giant 24-inch lenticular reproduction of the cover used in record store displays. An original set of bricks from the original Artchie Studios where the original cover was shot in 1967, polaroid peels and orange feathers from the original shoot, photo outtakes, hours of unheard studio outtakes, a hat tried on but not used by Bill Wyman. You name it. He’s paid for it. Dearly.

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As you traipse through the musician sqaulor of his New England apartment, he will lead you into the Majesties Room, where he has recreated as much of the album cover as the nearby Michael’s Crafts store can supply him with.
“Saturn had to be taken down for repairs,” he apologizes. He delights in showing you where the Beatles faces are hidden in the psychedelic shrubbery. “When people see the big orb of Jupiter or hear the millionth play of “Sing This All Together,”  that’s when you really know who your friends are.”

Oddly enough, nothing on his recent track “Brite and Sunny Future” reflects none of this musical influence. It’s about as psychedelic as a wooden toothpick but that’s just the way The Extended Play likes it. “I try to keep my fascination for Rolling Stones trying to be Hawkwind out of my music.”

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To download  or stream “Brite and Sunny Future,” “Serenity” and  other great free music, visit onusrecords.bandcamp.com
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Wednesday Progress Report: No Volcano CD Release Show

Thanks everyone for coming to the CD Release party for No Volcano’s Dead Horse Power. We had a lot of fun! In case you weren’t there, the evening started off with Less Pain Forever. James and Chris  showed up like dual Gordon’s fisherman, complete with yellow raincoats and a real life alien that didn’t do very much or meet the minimum drink requirements. They did however premiere a bunch of riveting new songs which may be on an Onus EP in the near future if you badger these men to relinquish some leisure time!

Next came No Volcano, striding onstage to the theme to Mister Ed while playing a set mostly consisting of songs from the new album and some unreleased as of yet standouts such as “Like an Eagle,” “Day in the Sun” and “To the Left.” Their four-month layoff from live work showed the band more raring to go than we have ever seen them. Jim also designed four brand new t-shirts that sold briskly, although the show’s MC and World’s Greatest Merch Booth merchant was heard to crow, “Was I right about the green shirts or wasn’t I ?” to anyone who’d listen.

Capping off the night was the always exciting Scorpion vs Tarantula who filled in gamely for The Father Figures on short notice. They blasted through the set with  selection’s from their new eponymous ten-inch. Yes it’s a ten-inch- don’t be intimidated , kids.

The next big Onus show will be the second anniversary show which is in the planning stages no, tentatively in January. There is some controversy on whether the company which started in January of 2015 is celebrating the 2nd  or 3rd anniversary. Onus Records CEO Tommy Globbit was heard arguing, we’ve only been around two full years. I’m not celebrating the third year until it’s over. Let us know if you agree or disagree with this summation.

Thanks to all the photographers who shot these wonderful photos!